Origins Of ‘Sir Charles’

A few weeks back, Wild.com ran a Q & A session with Minnesota prospect Charlie Coyle. After the story was published, the Lighthouse received an interesting email from former Saint John Sea Dogs Marketing and Communications Manager Nathan White. In the email, White details where he believes Coyle’s nickname “Sir Charles” might have originated:

Here’s how I think the nickname got started. For some reason, the QMJHL website listed him as Charles Coyle, although the team always referred to him as Charlie. We asked to have this changed, which was normally never a problem. (For example, we had players’ names corrected, or had Mathieu Corbeil-Theriault changed to just Corbeil). For some reason they refused to change it, the reason we got was that his birth certificate says Charles. Anyway, some fans got a kick out of “Charles Coyle” when he was quite a well-known player everyone called Charlie after seeing him play in two World Juniors. There is a pretty active team blog and online community around it, and not sure who exactly came up with it, but the Charles jokes turned to Sir Charles, probably on a night he had a bunch of points or something. Not sure if Charlie even knows that because he’s not really the type to pay a lot of attention to that stuff.

Coyle didn’t have any idea where the nickname originated or who came up with it, but at this point, it doesn’t really matter. The Lighthouse is a big fan of the moniker and will continue to use it.

No word on whether or not fellow rookies were calling Coyle “Sir Charles” at the NHLPA Rookie Showcase last week.

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